Learning Landscape eBulletin

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Still valuable the second time around!

Increasing biodiversity and carbon storage in secondary regrowth in the Wet Tropics.
 
 
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It gets better with age

Secondary forests are extensive in the tropics, accounting for 40% of the total forest area and their rates of formation are about nine million hectares per year. A recent paper by Goosem et al asks the following questions: Does age and isolation affect the rate of recovery of plant diversity and community composition in secondary rainforests? As secondary rainforests get older do they attain the diversity and composition found in a primary rainforest?
 
 
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Alien invasion of the inner space

Natural secondary succession of rainforest is a slow process and is frequently suppressed by woody weed competition. Tng et al describe the invasive attributes of shade tolerant strawberry guava (Psidium cattleianum) in an age sequence of secondary rainforest on the Atherton Tableland. Their conclusion is that its dense thickets both exclude native vegetation and reduce native species regeneration.
 
 
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Rainforest seeds do not fall far from the tree!

Compared to tree planting schemes natural regeneration is a viable, low cost restoration option in areas where soils have not been highly degraded, diverse natural seed sources grow nearby, and seed-dispersing fauna are present.
 
 
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What will happen if we leave the wattle?

Secondary rainforests regenerating on abandoned pasture are widespread and represent an opportunity to restore rainforest at minimal management cost, but can become arrested for long periods; possibly indefinitely. In the Wet Tropics secondary rainforests are frequently dominated by long-lived acacia species. A recent study asks the question: Will acacia secondary forest become rainforest in Australia's Wet Tropics?
 
 
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In the News July 2016

Recent news about research issues of relevance to the Wet Tropics.
 
 
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Research Updates July 2016

National and global rainforest research of relevance to the Wet Tropics.
 
 
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Policy Snapshot July 2016

Recent government policy developments relevant to the Wet Tropics.
 
 

Student Research Grants 2016

Each year the Wet Tropics Management Authority invites proposals from postgraduate students from across Australia to support environmental, social and cultural research which will benefit Wet Tropics World Heritage Area management, policy development and operational decision making. Here are this years lucky recipients.
 
 
 

News and Events

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News and Events

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Corridor opens new avenues for Wet Tropics wildlife

Corridor opens new avenues for Wet Tropics wildlife

A vigorous tree planting session held in March is set to create a critical ecological corridor for Wet Tropics wildlife, linking the tropical coa... READ MORE

Research grants fund further study into Wet Tropics

Research grants fund further study into Wet Tropics

The plight of some of Australia's rarest marsupials headline the latest funding splash into the world's oldest rainforest.... READ MORE

Yellow crazy ants discovered at new site in Cairns

Yellow crazy ants discovered at new site in Cairns

Authorities are working to contain a small outbreak of yellow crazy ants discovered in a south Cairns suburb.... READ MORE