Measuring success

Key performance indicators

The Strategic Plan identifies four key performance indicators (KPIs) against the four outcomes to be achieved. These outcomes are the ‘big things’ the Authority wants to collectively achieve to improve management of the Wet Tropics of Queensland World Heritage Area by 2030, and include some broad indicators that will quantify (and the KPIs qualify) our progress towards achieving these. The Strategic Plan identifies a suite of actions that could be implemented to achieve these outcomes, however not all actions may need to be delivered to achieve these outcomes.

Draft Wet Tropics Strategic Plan - outcomes. Released for public consultation as part of the Wet Tropics Management Plan review in March 2019.

As the Strategic Plan will be delivered in partnership, the KPIs have been developed to measure success  in a way that is meaningful to all our partners (i.e. will help to achieve individual and organisational goals of partners).

The Authority will report annually on progress against achieving these outcomes through our annual report. Major reviews will occur after five years (2025) and after 10 years (2030). This will inform ongoing adaptive management of delivery of the Strategic Plan, and indicate what role the Authority played in achieving these outcomes, where we might need to refocus our efforts, or simply do better.

It should be noted that baselines for a number of indicators may need to be established so that we can measure our progress. The Authority will be responsible for this body of work.


Outcome 1—World Heritage values of the Wet Tropics of Queensland World Heritage Area are maintained or enhanced

Key performance indicator 1

Success for achieving this outcome by 2030 is that trends for the condition of World Heritage values will remain stable, and may improve in some degraded areas of Zone B and C. We will adopt the measures used in periodic reporting by the Australian Government to the UNESCO World Heritage Centre. Examples of possible measures include:

  • state of conservation of natural assets
  • management effectiveness
  • invasive species
  • quality of life for local communities.


Daintree - Noah Creek
Photographer: David Cook

Outcome 2—Rainforest Aboriginal People’s rights, interests, traditions, and culture are embedded in management of the Wet Tropics of Queensland World Heritage Area, with aspirations for Traditional Owner-led management, livelihoods and wellbeing

Key performance indicator 2

Success for achieving this outcome by 2030 is that Rainforest Aboriginal People are strongly involved in management of the Wet Tropics of Queensland World Heritage Area in partnership with the Queensland and Commonwealth governments. This arrangement will likely be enabled through implementation of the Regional Agreement, and will involve a broad range of approaches that increase the involvement of Rainforest Aboriginal People directly in land management, and also increase the range of opportunities where Rainforest Aboriginal People can improve wellbeing and access economic benefits. Examples of possible measures include:

  • increased number of formalised land management partnerships between Rainforest Aboriginal People and government (e.g. cooperative management agreements, joint management of national parks, Indigenous Protected Areas etc)
  • culturally-appropriate governance mechanisms that ensure free, prior and informed consent of Rainforest Aboriginal People on matters relating to the World Heritage Area
  • employment of Rainforest Aboriginal People in World Heritage management
  • increased number of Indigenous ranger groups or Rainforest Aboriginal businesses.

RainforestAboriginalToxicPlantPrep
Photographer: Steve Nowakowski

Outcome 3—Management of the Wet Tropics of Queensland World Heritage Area is a shared responsibility of an engaged and informed Wet Tropics community

Key performance indicator 3

Success for achieving this outcome by 2030 is that there is a net increase in active community involvement in the management of the Wet Tropics of Queensland World Heritage Area (e.g. this would mean a net gain of capacity in volunteer groups who are actively engaged in management). Examples of possible measures include:

  • improved trend in volunteer numbers (groups and number of people participating)
  • increased education and engagement initiatives
  • increased levels of research, and adoption of this in management
  • increased participation rates of young people (under 35) in volunteering.

Russett Park - Yellow Crazy Ants volunteers
Photographer: YCA

Outcome 4—The Wet Tropics of Queensland World Heritage Area is recognised as a world-class sustainable natural and cultural tourism destination

Key performance indicator 4

Success for achieving this outcome by 2030, the Wet Tropics of Queensland World Heritage Area will be recognised nationally and globally as a must-see natural and cultural tourism destination and an example of best practice World Heritage presentation (where the visitor experience is rich, enjoyable, and fosters a sense  of responsibility to care for the Area). The Authority will advance opportunities for people to better appreciate and understand the special values and attributes of the World Heritage Area, and create pathways for Rainforest Aboriginal People to participate more in tourism and presentation activities across the World Heritage Area. Examples of possible measures include:

  • number of tourism opportunities that embrace and protect the natural and cultural values of the World Heritage Area
  • number of Rainforest Aboriginal owned and operated business enterprises that embrace and protect the natural and cultural values of the World Heritage Area
  • quality of visitor experience (as measured by surveys and other qualitative approaches) and number of accredited Wet Tropics Tour Guides.

Skyrail's Red Peak Station.
Photographer: Skyrail

Have your say | Submissions close on Thursday 18 April 2019 


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