Having trouble viewing this eBulletin? View this eBulletin in a browser  |  Unsubscribe
Learning Lanscape
divider Divider

Welcome to the 5th edition e-Bulletin

Edition 5: Friday, 22nd September 2017 divider

Although a lot of policy-making is determined by changes in climate averages, it is climate extremes that are thought to be most immediately hazardous to biodiversity. Statistically, any period of history will exhibit extremes of temperature, rainfall and other climate parameters, but it is when these extremes become more intense than in the past that alarm bells ring.
Read more

divider
Daintree River estuary Photographer: WTMA
divider
Divider

Heat waves - the real game changer

divider
divider

Rainforest and reef Photographer: Mike Trenerry
divider
divider
Heatwaves in Australia are becoming hotter, longer, more frequent, and occurring earlier. The first detailed quantitative assessment of the vulnerability of biodiversity in the Wet Tropics to heat stress has recently been undertaken. A common feature of many of the most vulnerable species is that they are mountain-top species with small distributions.
Read more
divider
Divider

No rain - no rainforest?

divider
You cannot take all the water out of the oceans or remove all the sand from the deserts but scientists in the Daintree rainforest have found a way to remove the rain from some of the Daintree rainforest. Thankfully it is all in the name of science and the other important consideration is the area used is only half a hectare. The reason for the experiment is critically important as the frequency of severe droughts is increasing in many regions around the world as a result of climate change.
Read more
divider
Rainforest Drought Project Photographer: Bill Lawrance
divider
Divider

Mountain top plants - nowhere left to go?

divider
In the Wet Tropics tropical mountains are biodiversity hotspots and major centres of local endemism. Mountain forest ecosystems are characterised by frequent cloud or mist inundation and climatic zones that get compressed over short distances along steep altitudinal gradients. High-altitude specialist plant species rely on cool temperatures and abundant moisture for their survival. This makes them particularly vulnerable to a changing climate.
Read more
divider
Mossman Bluff Photographer: Campbell Clarke
divider
Divider
Divider

In this edition

Heat waves - the real game changer
No rain - no rainforest?
Mountain top plants - nowhere left to go?
Postgrad Profile - Mason's Mad about Plants
Policy Update February 2016
In the News - Feb 2016
Rainforest Research Update February 2016
Divider

Postgrad Profile

Mason Campbell is a PhD student from James Cook University in Cairns studying under the supervision of Distinguished Professor Bill Laurance and Associate Professor Will Edwards. Mason
Read More

Divider

Policy Update February 2016

Recent government policy developments relevant to the Wet Tropics.
Read More

Divider

In the News - Feb 2016

Recent news about tropical research issues for the Wet Tropics World Heritage Area.
Read More

Divider

Rainforest Research Update February 2016

National and global rainforest research of relevance to the Wet Tropics
Read More

Divider