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Learning Lanscape
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Welcome to the threatened species edition - Wet Tropics eBulletin

Edition 4: Friday, 22nd September 2017 divider

The Wet Tropics Learning Landscape eBulletin profiles current and emerging Wet Tropics research and related management and policy issues.

This 4th edition focuses on the threatened species and ecological communities of Australia
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Spotted tailed quoll Photographer: WTMA
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The Wet Tropics - a microcosm of species diversity and decline

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White lemuroid ringtail possum Photographer: Mike Trenerry
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The Wet Tropics World Heritage Area is a microcosm of the broader biodiversity crisis facing our nation. Australia is one of the most biodiverse countries in the world. Recognised as one of seventeen megadiverse nations, Australia has more natural World Heritage sites and more known endemic species than any other country.

Disturbingly, we also have the largest documented decline in biodiversity of any continent over the past two hundred years and lay claim to the one of the worst rate of mammal extinctions in the world.

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Wet Tropics threatened species

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The Wet Tropics is the second most irreplaceable natural World Heritage site on Earth. It is a significant centre of local endemism and is also a hotspot for threatened plants and animals.
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The rare Xanthostemon formosus is found only in the Daintree area. Photographer: WTMA
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Beyond the periphery

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A National Environment Research Program study has examined the important role that peripheral areas play in conserving Wet Tropics rainforest fauna. The study found a number of endangered frog species are persisting better in peripheral areas than in adjacent core rainforest habitat.
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Armoured mist frog (Litoria lorica) Photographer: Conrad Hoskin
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How many cassowaries are there in the Wet Tropics?

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The Southern Cassowary is one of the most distinctive birds in Australia, but it can be hard to find. A recent population study estimates there are about 4400 in the Wet Tropics.
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Cassowary at Mission Beach Photographer: Dave Kimble
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A casque of thousands

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Find out about the structure of a cassowary casque and its functional and evolutionary implications.
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Cassowary and palm seeds Photographer: Liz Gallie
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In this edition

The Wet Tropics - a microcosm of species diversity and decline
Wet Tropics threatened species
Beyond the periphery
How many cassowaries are there in the Wet Tropics?
A casque of thousands
'To save Australia's mammals we need a change of heart'
Postgrad Profile - Wren's rainforest cassowary watch
Policy snapshot June 2015
In the news June 2015
Rainforest research update June 2015
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'To save Australia's mammals we need a change of heart'



We must accept that biodiversity conservation is not only an obligation of government, but a shared societal responsibility.
John Woinarski and Peter Harrison

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Postgrad Profile

Wren Mclean is an Honours student studying the diet and habitat use of the Southern Cassowary in the Daintree rainforest.
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Policy snapshot June 2015

Recent government policy developments relevant to the Wet Tropics
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In the news June 2015

Recent news about tropical research issues of relevance to the Wet Tropics
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Rainforest research update June 2015

National and global rainforest research of relevance to the Wet Tropics
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